The Harmful Myth Of Asian Superiority Thesis

The Harmful Myth Of Asian Superiority Thesis-75
This leaves underlying structural problems unchallenged, or worse, reinforced.In this environment, Asian American organizations face pressure to elbow for political clout in a zero-sum game of racial inclusion.The Asian American movement once espoused strong antiracist and anti-imperialist values.

This leaves underlying structural problems unchallenged, or worse, reinforced.In this environment, Asian American organizations face pressure to elbow for political clout in a zero-sum game of racial inclusion.The Asian American movement once espoused strong antiracist and anti-imperialist values.

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Those who do identify as Asian American tend to be younger, later generation, or living in geographic areas where there is no single, dominate Asian ethnic subgroup.

Some described how the media and technology served as a way for isolated Asian Americans to find a sense of identification with one another.

Arguments of Asian cultural superiority often try to validate the model minority label: The success of Asian-Americans in the United States is “a tribute to hard work, strong families and passion for education.” Positive stereotypes about Asian-Americans are frequently seen as more beneficial than detrimental to the student psyche, in spite of research that these stereotypes harm Asian-American students' mental health and well-being.

The most poignant consequence of the model minority label is its failure to acknowledge socioeconomic and education disparities among the diverse range of communities categorized as Asian-American.

Many participants said that low-wage Asian American workers have the highest level of race consciousness.

People told us that at the same time that Asian Americans do not think about race generally, they have also internalized a sense of superiority over other people of color, particularly Black people.In general, participants said that Asian Americans tend to hold negative ideas of Black people and Latinos, and do not think about Native Americans at all.Several participants lamented that the term “Asian American” or “API” no longer signifies a set of progressive political ideas as it once did in the ‘60s and ‘70s.There is a sense that to the degree that an Asian American consciousness exists, it is not very progressive and not very racialized.People expressed tremendous ambivalence over whether organizing around Asian American identity would be strategic for the racial justice movement.Some argue that advocating for the rights of Asian Americans constitutes a racial justice strategy, regardless of the impact on other communities.Others believe that there can be no justice for Asian Americans without justice for all people of color.Participants told us that building a base of Asian Americans who could act as strong allies to other people of color demanded organizing, and political education in particular, to counter mainstream messages about race.Specific examples of such work included organizations working in low-income neighborhoods or with low-wage workers, using storytelling, relationship building, and honest dialogue.Some feared that it would do more harm than good, because it would reinforce ideas of Asian American exceptionalism.Others said that it would be timely to do so now, because the post-1965 waves of immigration had created new opportunities to forge a strong, progressive, antiracist identity that could push back against the more reactionary tendencies within Asian American communities.

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