Teenage Years Are The Hardest Essay

Teenage Years Are The Hardest Essay-58
While this re-arrangement is going on, decision-making is re-routed via the amygdala, a primal part of their brain which reacts instantaneously and emotionally to any perceived threat. Frances Jensen, author of new book 'The Teenage Brain’ says: 'Teenagers make much more sense when you understand that the frontal lobes of the brain - the part responsible for judgment, impulse control, mood and emotions - is the last part to fully develop.'So the brain just doesn’t know how to regulate itself yet. ' Of course, it’s easy to assume that this doesn’t matter because teens never listen anyway, but, on the contrary, they are hypersensitive to our opinions of them. To confused adolescent, such despairing comments from the parent who is supposed to love them the most, can cut deep.

While this re-arrangement is going on, decision-making is re-routed via the amygdala, a primal part of their brain which reacts instantaneously and emotionally to any perceived threat. Frances Jensen, author of new book 'The Teenage Brain’ says: 'Teenagers make much more sense when you understand that the frontal lobes of the brain - the part responsible for judgment, impulse control, mood and emotions - is the last part to fully develop.'So the brain just doesn’t know how to regulate itself yet. ' Of course, it’s easy to assume that this doesn’t matter because teens never listen anyway, but, on the contrary, they are hypersensitive to our opinions of them. To confused adolescent, such despairing comments from the parent who is supposed to love them the most, can cut deep.

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So, instead, let your home be a haven from the pressures of the outside world where they can relax and recharge.

As children head into the teen years and appear to want to be around you less, the biggest mistake parents make is 'letting them get on with it.’ After all, if you have a stroppy adolescent mooching around like a bear with a sore head, it can frankly be a relief when they disappear into their room.

Furthermore you are only teaching your child’s impressionable brain that shouting is the appropriate response, creating a negative feed-back loop which means you will only be end up on the receiving end of more hair-dryer treatment yourself.

Indeed thirteen-year-olds who received a lot of harsh verbal discipline from their parents were fond to be more likely to have symptoms of depression at age 14, according to recent findings published in the journal Child Development.

But imagine how you would feel if you found your boss waiting at home for you every night to grill you on your performance.

We have assumed the role of our children’s trainers, feeling entitled to continually bombard them with suggestions about what they should be doing better.British youngsters are already the most tested in the world, and get so many assessments, it’s likely your teen will know exactly how they are doing.The damage caused by our constant incitements to try harder and do better can do long-term damage to your relationship.Such messages get turned inwards into negative self-talk.These voices can be very hard to silence once they take hold in a teen’s malleable brain, just as it is laying down the pathways which will influence their future mental health.Worse still, it sends the message you think there is something fundamentally defective about your child, which can never be changed.What’s actually 'wrong’ with teens is that the frontal lobes in their brains, which controls impulses, reasoning and planning, are the last to be rewired for adulthood.There isn’t a parent with a teenager who hasn’t been told 'You’re ruining my life’ or 'I hate you’ at some point.But if that’s not bad enough, their behaviour can get even worse if we fail to understand the brain changes triggering these outbursts.But if you let distance grow between you, you will not be able to reach your child at a time when they have never been more at risk from issues, like depressions, cyber-addiction, eating disorders and self-harm.The less time you spend with them, the more they will feel like 'outsiders’ and the worse their behaviour will become.

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