Essays On The Grapes Of Wrath Theme

Essays On The Grapes Of Wrath Theme-60
According to Steinbeck, many of the evils that plague the Joad family and the migrants stem from selfishness.Simple self-interest motivates the landowners and businessmen to sustain a system that sinks thousands of families into poverty.

According to Steinbeck, many of the evils that plague the Joad family and the migrants stem from selfishness.Simple self-interest motivates the landowners and businessmen to sustain a system that sinks thousands of families into poverty.

In Chapter 13, we learn that corporate gas companies have preyed upon the gas station attendant that the Joads meet.

The attendant, in turn, insults the Joads and hesitates to help them.

Throughout the novel, Steinbeck constantly emphasizes self-interest and altruism as equal and opposite powers, evenly matched in their conflict with each other.

In Chapters 13 and 15, for example, Steinbeck presents both greed and generosity as self-perpetuating, following cyclical dynamics.

The Joads stand as exemplary figures in their refusal to be broken by the circumstances that conspire against them.

At every turn, Steinbeck seems intent on showing their dignity and honor; he emphasizes the importance of maintaining self-respect in order to survive spiritually.

In contrast to and in conflict with this policy of selfishness stands the migrants’ behavior toward one another.

Aware that their livelihood and survival depend upon their devotion to the collective good, the migrants unite—sharing their dreams as well as their burdens—in order to survive.

The loss of home became one loss, and the golden time in the West was one dream.” In the face of adversity, the livelihood of the migrants depends upon their union.

As Tom eventually realizes, “his” people are all people.

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